I survived septoplasty, turbinoplasty, and endoscopic sinus surgery. So can you!

As some of you may recall, a few years ago I began having a lot of dental work. I needed a lot of work and decided to get some implants in the lower right of my jaw. One thing I didn’t tell many is my Oral Surgeon had located what looked like a tumor in my left sinus and recommended a ENT Doctor evaluate it further. I later found out it was a mucous retention cyst. A lot of people have these and have no idea, for the most part, they aren’t harmful.

However, in the same ENT appointment, I confirmed a suspicion I have had for a while – I have a deviated septum. It was the only explanation for my inability to breathe all these years, and possibly for me being such a loud snorer. On an unrelated note, I had just had a MRI of my brain and the imagery revealed my turbinates are also enlarged, contributing the problem of nasal aspiration.

Without getting too ‘medical-termy’, turbinates help warm the air as you breathe in, keep your nose moist, among other things. Your nose cycles every 6 hours (roughly), as this happens the turbinates swell with blood. In most people, the nasal passages shrink a little, but you can still breathe through both passages. In mine, they couldn’t get the smallest endoscope up my nose. My nasal aspiration was very restricted. Finally, I opted for surgery to fix the deviated septum (septoplasty), reduce the size of the turbinates (turbinoplasty), and endoscopic nasal/sinus surgery (to remove the tumor in my left sinus cavity).

If you’re in a situation like mine and have considered surgery but aren’t sure, I hope this well help.

Continue with reading